Digital Collections: Topics A - L

A Special Topic Guide

Digital Collections: A - L

This section of the Digital Collections guide contains references to topics ranging alphabetically from A to L. Information in the descriptions below has been taken from the respective digital collections.
 

AFRO-ETHNIC STUDIES
 

The Church in the Southern Black Community, 1780-1925

This compilation of printed texts from the libraries at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill traces how Southern African Americans experienced and transformed Protestant Christianity into the central institution of community life. Coverage begins with white churches' conversion efforts, especially in the post-Revolutionary period, and depicts the tensions and contradictions between the egalitarian potential of evangelical Christianity and the realities of slavery. It focuses, through slave narratives and observations by other African American authors, on how the black community adapted evangelical Christianity, making it a metaphor for freedom, community, and personal survival. An award from the Library of Congress/Ameritech National Digital Library Competition supported the digitization of 100 titles. The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill supplemented these titles with thirty-five additional texts illuminating the same theme.



The Holsinger Studio Collection

The Holsinger Studio Collection constitutes a unique photographic record of life in Charlottesville and Albemarle County, Virginia, from before the turn of the century through World War I. The collection consists of approximately 9,000 dry-plate glass negatives and 500 celluloid negatives from the commercial studio of Rufus W. Holsinger . Approximately two-thirds of the collection are studio portraits, and among these are nearly 500 portraits of African-American citizens of Charlottesville and the surrounding area.  This digital collection is made possible by the University of Virginia Library.


 

AMERICAN STUDIES

America in the 1930s

This digital collection chronicles American life during the 1930s in areas such as print, film, and radio. Hosted by the American Studies program at the University of Virginia, the collection also offers access to a timeline of the 1930s.



American Memory

American Memory provides free and open access through the Internet to written and spoken words, sound recordings, still and moving images, prints, maps, and sheet music that document the American experience. It is a digital record of American history and creativity. These materials, from the collections of the Library of Congress and other institutions, chronicle historical events, people, places, and ideas that continue to shape America, serving the public as a resource for education and lifelong learning. 



Frank M. Hohenberger Photograph Collection

Photographer and newspaperman Frank Hohenberger spent forty-seven years recording the life, customs, and scenes of the hills of Brown County, Indiana, with side trips and hired assignments in other areas of Indiana, Kentucky, South Carolina, and Mexico. Thousands of images taken from 1904-1948 of landscapes, buildings, and people testify to Hohenberger's belief, recorded in his diary, that "pictures speak the only language all mankind can understand." This collection is presented by the Indiana University Digital Library Program and the Indiana University Lilly Library.

 

July 1942: United We Stand

This collection, courtesy of the National Museum of American History at the Smithsonian Institution, demonstrates how some of our past is saved. It also shows how seemingly ordinary magazine covers take on greater meaning when examined as part of a larger story.  Many of the covers were collected in the summer of 1942 by Marguerite Jacquette Storm (1892–1976), who wrote to friends across the country asking for their flag magazines.



Making of America (via Cornell University and the University of Michigan)

A digital library of primary sources in American social history from the antebellum period through reconstruction. The collection is particularly strong in the subject areas of education, psychology, American history, sociology, religion, and science and technology.  The project represents a major collaborative endeavor in preservation and electronic access to historical texts.



The Urban Landscape Digital Image Access Project 

The Urban Landscape Digital Image Access Project is a database of images from various collections held by the Rare Book, Manuscript, and Special Collections Library at Duke University. The database contains 1,000 images pertaining to the theme "The Urban Landscape" from fourteen different collections.

 



ART


Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco (de Young Museum and Legion of Honor)

Both the de Young Museum and the Legion of Honor in San Francisco offer online visitors the opportunity to search and browse collections that include European painting, European decorative art, ancient art, and works on paper.

 

Harold Cazneaux - Australian Observer

The photographs of Harold Cazneaux are timeless in their creative beauty and their extraordinary tonal qualities. Cazneaux was the leading exponent in Australia of the school of 'pictorial photography.' Indeed, Max Dupain once called him 'the father of modern Australian photography.' The pictorialists argued that every photograph should be a work of art and that the camera was an aesthetic instrument to be used on the way to a final image rather than a purely functional too. This digital collection is made possible by the National Library of Australia.



Los Angeles Country Museum of Art (LACMA) Collections Online

LACMA offers the public an opportunity to search online and view over 65,000 records and more than 45,000 images. This digital collection continues to grow and offers the ability to search by artist, by popular searches, and by using advanced-search features.

 

Pictures Catalogue: The National Library of Autstralia's Pictorial Collection

Under the terms of the National Library Act 1960, one function of the Library is to maintain and develop a national collection of library material relating to Australia and the Australian people, and to make this material available to persons and institutions. The collection is mainly Australian in content and the original art works are predominantly dated in the nineteenth century. Paintings, drawings and prints dated later than 1890 are collected very selectively because by this time photography was well established and for the twentieth century, photographs are usually preferred.

Web Gallery of Art

The Web Gallery of Art is a virtual museum and searchable database of European painting and sculpture of the Romanesque, Gothic, Renaissance, Baroque, Neoclassicism, Romanticism periods (1000-1850), currently containing over 25.200 reproductions. Picture commentaries, artist biographies are available. Guided tours, period music, catalogue, free postcard and other services are provided.


ASIAN & ASIAN-AMERICAN STUDIES

JARDA: Japanese American Relocation Digital Archive

JARDA contains thousands of Japanese American internment primary source materials, including the following: personal diaries, letters, photographs, and drawings; U.S. War Relocation Authority materials, including camp newsletters, final reports, photographs, and other documents relating to the day-to-day administration of the camps; and personal histories documenting the lives of the people who lived in the camps as well as the administrators who created and worked in the camps.  This digital collection is made possible by Calisphere, a service of the University of California Libraries, and is powered by the California Digital Library.

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES


Freshwater and Marine Image Bank 

The Freshwater and Marine Image Bank, made possible by the University of Washington Libraries, is an ongoing digital collection of images related to freshwater and marine topics, in all their diversity. It includes images of fish, shellfish, and marine mammals, pictures of fish hatcheries and dams and vessels, materials related to polar exploration, regional and traditional fisheries, and limnological (freshwater) subjects. Its scope is global.

BUSINESS

Ad*Access

The Ad*Access Project, funded by the Duke Endowment "Library 2000" Fund, presents images and database information for over 7,000 advertisements printed in U.S. and Canadian newspapers and magazines between 1911 and 1955. Ad*Access concentrates on five main subject areas: Radio, Television, Transportation, Beauty and Hygiene, and World War II, providing a coherent view of a number of major campaigns and companies through images preserved in one particular advertising collection available at Duke University.

COMPARATIVE RELIGION
 

The Church in the Southern Black Community, 1780-1925

This compilation of printed texts from the libraries at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill traces how Southern African Americans experienced and transformed Protestant Christianity into the central institution of community life. Coverage begins with white churches' conversion efforts, especially in the post-Revolutionary period, and depicts the tensions and contradictions between the egalitarian potential of evangelical Christianity and the realities of slavery. It focuses, through slave narratives and observations by other African American authors, on how the black community adapted evangelical Christianity, making it a metaphor for freedom, community, and personal survival. An award from the Library of Congress/Ameritech National Digital Library Competition supported the digitization of 100 titles. The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill supplemented these titles with thirty-five additional texts illuminating the same theme.

Making of America (via Cornell University and the University of Michigan)

A digital library of primary sources in American social history from the antebellum period through reconstruction. The collection is particularly strong in the subject areas of education, psychology, American history, sociology, religion, and science and technology.  The project represents a major collaborative endeavor in preservation and electronic access to historical texts.

Sunday School Books: Shaping the Values of Youth in the Nineteenth Century

This collection presents 163 Sunday school books published in America between 1815 and 1865, drawn from the collections of Michigan State University Libraries and the Clarke Historical Library at Central Michigan University Libraries. They document the culture of religious instruction of youth in America during the Antebellum era. They also illustrate a number of thematic divisions that preoccupied nineteenth-century America, including sacred and secular, natural and divine, civilized and savage, rural and industrial, adult and child.

ENGLISH / COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

Internet Library of Early Journals (ILEJ)

ILEJ is a joint project by the Universities of Birmingham, Leeds, Manchester and Oxford, conducted under the auspices of the Electronic Libraries Programme.  The project finished in 1999, and there are no plans to add additional material.  The aim of this project was to digitize substantial runs of 18th and 19th century journals and make these images available on the Internet, together with their associated bibliographic data.

FRENCH

Gallica: Bibliothèque nationale de France

A database offered by the French National Library for searching a digital collection of books, manuscripts, maps, images, periodicals, sound recordings, and scores.

HISTORY

America in the 1930s

This digital collection chronicles American life during the 1930s in areas such as print, film, and radio. Hosted by the American Studies program at the University of Virginia, the collection also offers access to a timeline of the 1930s.
 

American Memory

American Memory provides free and open access through the Internet to written and spoken words, sound recordings, still and moving images, prints, maps, and sheet music that document the American experience. It is a digital record of American history and creativity. These materials, from the collections of the Library of Congress and other institutions, chronicle historical events, people, places, and ideas that continue to shape America, serving the public as a resource for education and lifelong learning.
 

Calisphere

Calisphere is the University of California's free public gateway to a world of primary sources. More than 150,000 digitized items — including photographs, documents, newspaper pages, political cartoons, works of art, diaries, transcribed oral histories, advertising, and other unique cultural artifacts — reveal the diverse history and culture of California and its role in national and world history. Calisphere's content has been selected from the libraries and museums of the UC campuses, and from a variety of cultural heritage organizations across California. Calisphere is a public service project of the California Digital Library (CDL).

Chicago Anarchists on Trial: Evidence from the Haymarket Affair, 1886-1887

This collection, made possible by the Library of Congress, showcases more than 3,800 images of original manuscripts, broadsides, photographs, prints and artifacts relating to the Haymarket Affair. The violent confrontation between Chicago police and labor protesters in 1886 proved to be a pivotal setback in the struggle for American workers' rights. These materials pertain to: the May 4, 1886 meeting and bombing; to the trial, conviction and subsequent appeals of those accused of inciting the bombing; and to the execution of four of the convicted and the later pardon of the remaining defendants.

The Church in the Southern Black Community, 1780-1925

This compilation of printed texts from the libraries at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill traces how Southern African Americans experienced and transformed Protestant Christianity into the central institution of community life. Coverage begins with white churches' conversion efforts, especially in the post-Revolutionary period, and depicts the tensions and contradictions between the egalitarian potential of evangelical Christianity and the realities of slavery. It focuses, through slave narratives and observations by other African American authors, on how the black community adapted evangelical Christianity, making it a metaphor for freedom, community, and personal survival. An award from the Library of Congress/Ameritech National Digital Library Competition supported the digitization of 100 titles. The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill supplemented these titles with thirty-five additional texts illuminating the same theme.

Colorado Plateau Digital Archives

The Cline Library at Northern Arizona University (NAU) offers the Colorado Plateau Digital Archives, which currently provides access to thousands of vintage and contemporary photographs, diaries and letters, oral history interviews, films, and maps which document the history of the region and NAU.
 

Historic Government Publications from WWII

This digital collection from the Central University Libraries (CUL) at Southern Methodist University contains 343 Informational pamphlets, government reports, instructions, regulations, declarations, speeches, and propaganda materials distributed by the U.S. Government Printing Office (GPO) during the Second World War.

The Holsinger Studio Collection

The Holsinger Studio Collection constitutes a unique photographic record of life in Charlottesville and Albemarle County, Virginia, from before the turn of the century through World War I. The collection consists of approximately 9,000 dry-plate glass negatives and 500 celluloid negatives from the commercial studio of Rufus W. Holsinger . Approximately two-thirds of the collection are studio portraits, and among these are nearly 500 portraits of African-American citizens of Charlottesville and the surrounding area.  This digital collection is made possible by the University of Virginia Library.

Internet Library of Early Journals (ILEJ)

ILEJ is a joint project by the Universities of Birmingham, Leeds, Manchester and Oxford, conducted under the auspices of the Electronic Libraries Programme.  The project finished in 1999, and there are no plans to add additional material.  The aim of this project was to digitize substantial runs of 18th and 19th century journals and make these images available on the Internet, together with their associated bibliographic data.
 

July 1942: United We Stand

This collection, courtesy of the National Museum of American History at the Smithsonian Institution, demonstrates how some of our past is saved. It also shows how seemingly ordinary magazine covers take on greater meaning when examined as part of a larger story.  Many of the covers were collected in the summer of 1942 by Marguerite Jacquette Storm (1892–1976), who wrote to friends across the country asking for their flag magazines.

Making of America (via Cornell University and the University of Michigan)
A digital library of primary sources in American social history from the antebellum period through reconstruction. The collection is particularly strong in the subject areas of education, psychology, American history, sociology, religion, and science and technology.  The project represents a major collaborative endeavor in preservation and electronic access to historical texts.
 

Sunday School Books: Shaping the Values of Youth in the Nineteenth Century

This collection presents 163 Sunday school books published in America between 1815 and 1865, drawn from the collections of Michigan State University Libraries and the Clarke Historical Library at Central Michigan University Libraries. They document the culture of religious instruction of youth in America during the Antebellum era. They also illustrate a number of thematic divisions that preoccupied nineteenth-century America, including sacred and secular, natural and divine, civilized and savage, rural and industrial, adult and child.
 

The Urban Landscape Digital Image Access Project 

The Urban Landscape Digital Image Access Project is a database of images from various collections held by the Rare Book, Manuscript, and Special Collections Library at Duke University. The database contains 1,000 images pertaining to the theme "The Urban Landscape" from fourteen different collections.

LATIN-AMERICAN STUDIES
 

Cuban Heritage Collection

A digital collection from the University of Miami Digital Libraries Program offering digital manuscripts, photographs, letters, maps and other resources held in the University of Miami Libraries Cuban Heritage Collection. These presentations have been developed collaboratively by teams comprised of archivists, Digital Initiatives staff and the Cataloging Department.

Subject Guide